the million hour work week

So, while applying to the summer hadar program, I discovered that apparently hadar believes in 30 hour days because it is an 8 to 9 schedule! That’s like 10,000 hours! I mean, I knew it would be like drisha on steroids, and I’m not THAT scared, but I hope I can keep up, If they accept me, that is. I did include my whole “my mom isn’t Jewish, yeah sorry, what can I do about it” thing, and I know that’s kind of a standing issue for them, so I might just be a liability.

They also want you to daven there and have shabbos there and have sunday evening lectures there. I feel like that, if anything, would make me decide what to do about this fork in the road. After two months living in the west end shul, I think I’d have an answer. I mean, I practically lived at drisha in july, and look what happened then.

I think I might go to grad school for social work. I say this after I realized how many schools apparently offer concurrent Jewish Studies or Jewish Communal Service certificates along with the MSW degree, and if that’s such a thing I think that’s a pretty good sign. And my Jewish Studies degree could actually be worth something, maybe. What I don’t like is that a lot of the schools will only let you concentrate in boring things, like “Old Age” or “Child Welfare.” There is at least one school, University of Toronto, that will let you concentrate in “Diversity.” There’s also Smith, which obviously has lots of “How to Treat LGBT Clients” courses. I guess that’s pretty neat.

4 thoughts on “the million hour work week

  1. It’s tough, but you can do it! They actually require you to daven there, and Shabbatons take place in different places and aren’t every week. (I did it one summer. It was amazing. I recommend doing it when you’re as young as you can, but ready. I did it when I was 29 and it would have been easier at 19. Although I wouldn’t have wanted to at 19, so there’s that consideration!)

  2. Awesome! It seems so intense…in a good way. I guess I can never be “sure” that I’m ready, but I do know I would never make it if I hadn’t been to Drisha first!

    I tell you one thing though, that Drisha shabbaton was something I could only handle one of per month, probably. Ha.

  3. I think that there were only maybe two Shabbatons the whole summer when I was at Hadar, but I could be mis-remembering. It’s been awhile, and I think I stayed with friends for the ones that weren’t walkable from my apartment, so it wasn’t so all-consuming. I’ve learned in both places, and they have different vibes. More self-satisfaction and arrogant young men at Yeshivat Hadar; more emotional narishkeit (between students) at Drisha. I am so glad that I learned in both environments.

    Also, you wouldn’t be the first student there with a Jewish father and non-Jewish mother. It’s probably a conversation to have, but I don’t think it’s a deal-breaker for them. (Though, again, things may have changed there.)

  4. More self-satisfaction and arrogant young men at Yeshivat Hadar; more emotional narishkeit (between students) at Drisha.

    Heh. I could see that. The vibe at Drisha was great.

    Also, you wouldn’t be the first student there with a Jewish father and non-Jewish mother.

    I suspected as much……I am absolutely dying to find out what their official position on that is.

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